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Latvia:
Military & Transnational Issues

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Other pages in this profile of Latvia:
Geography, People, Government, Economy, Communications & Transportation,
Military branches
Definition
Latvian Republic Defense Force: Ground Forces, Navy (Latvijas Juras Speki; includes Coast Guard (Latvijas Kara Flotes)), Latvian Air Force (Latvijas Gaisa Speki), Border Guard, Latvian Home Guard (Latvijas Zemessardze) (2008)
Military service age and obligation
Definition
18 years of age for voluntary military service; conscription abolished January 2007; under current law, every citizen is entitled to serve in the armed forces for life (2006)
Manpower available for military service
Definition
males age 16-49: 568,683
females age 16-49: 565,826 (2008 est.)
Manpower fit for military service
Definition - World rank and map
males age 16-49: 412,849
females age 16-49: 468,827 (2008 est.)
Manpower reaching militarily significant age annually
Definition
males age 16-49: 14,506
females age 16-49: 13,982 (2008 est.)
Military expenditures - percent of GDP
Definition - World rank and map
1.2% (2005 est.)
Disputes - international
Definition
Russia refuses to sign the 1997 boundary treaty due to Latvian insistence on a unilateral clarificatory declaration referencing Soviet occupation of Latvia and territorial losses; Russia demands better Latvian treatment of ethnic Russians in Latvia; as of January 2007, ground demarcation of the boundary with Belarus was complete and mapped with final ratification documentation in preparation; the Latvian parliament has not ratified its 1998 maritime boundary treaty with Lithuania, primarily due to concerns over oil exploration rights; as a member state that forms part of the EU's external border, Latvia has implemented the strict Schengen border rules with Russia
Illicit drugs
Definition
transshipment and destination point for cocaine, synthetic drugs, opiates, and cannabis from Southwest Asia, Western Europe, Latin America, and neighboring Balkan countries; despite improved legislation, vulnerable to money laundering due to nascent enforcement capabilities and comparatively weak regulation of offshore companies and the gaming industry; CIS organized crime (including counterfeiting, corruption, extortion, stolen cars, and prostitution) accounts for most laundered proceeds


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