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Pitcairn Islands:
Geography

Flag of Pitcairn Islands
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Pitcairn Islands Page


Other pages in this profile of the Pitcairn Islands:
People, Government, Economy, Communications & Transportation, Military & Transnational Issues.
Background
Definition
Pitcairn Island was discovered in 1767 by the British and settled in 1790 by the Bounty mutineers and their Tahitian companions. Pitcairn was the first Pacific island to become a British colony (in 1838) and today remains the last vestige of that empire in the South Pacific. Outmigration, primarily to New Zealand, has thinned the population from a peak of 233 in 1937 to less than 50 today.
Location
Definition
Oceania, islands in the South Pacific Ocean, about midway between Peru and New Zealand
Geographic coordinates
Definition
25 04 S, 130 06 W
Map references
Definition
Oceania
Area
Definition - World rank and map
total: 47 sq km
land: 47 sq km
water: 0 sq km
Area - comparative
Definition
about 0.3 times the size of Washington, DC
Land boundaries
Definition
0 km
Coastline
Definition
51 km
Maritime claims
Definition
territorial sea: 3 nm
exclusive economic zone: 200 nm
Climate
Definition
tropical; hot and humid; modified by southeast trade winds; rainy season (November to March)
Terrain
Definition
rugged volcanic formation; rocky coastline with cliffs
Elevation extremes
Definition
lowest point: Pacific Ocean 0 m
highest point: Pawala Valley Ridge 347 m
Natural resources
Definition
miro trees (used for handicrafts), fish
note: manganese, iron, copper, gold, silver, and zinc have been discovered offshore
Land use
Definition - World rank and map
arable land: NA
permanent crops: NA
other: NA
Irrigated land
Definition
NA
Natural hazards
Definition
typhoons (especially November to March)
Environment - current issues
Definition
deforestation (only a small portion of the original forest remains because of burning and clearing for settlement)
Geography - note
Definition
Britain's most isolated dependency; only the larger island of Pitcairn is inhabited but it has no port or natural harbor; supplies must be transported by rowed longboat from larger ships stationed offshore


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